Conference Program

Please note that the IFP Conference for 2020 has been postponed to 2021. The below conference program will change for 2021. 

 

Please see below the IFP2020 Conference Program. The program below is split between Day 1 and 2 schedules, plenaries and abstracts. You can also find the list of presenters here.

 

For a PDF version of the schedule, please click on the button below.

Day 1 - Friday, May 29

8:00 AM

Registration Opens

Breakfast

9:00 AM – 9:30 AM

Welcome Remarks

9:30 AM – 10:45 AM

Breakout Sessions 1

Paper Presentations 1 9:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Translingual Reading in the Post-Secondary Context

Greening the Curriculum: Addressing Climate Crisis in the EAP Classroom

Paper Presentations 2 10:15 AM - 10:45 AM

A Native English-Speaking Teacher’s Plurilingual Pratice: Tensions and Agency at a Korean University

Instantiations of Multiliteracies Pedagogy in the EAP Course Classroom

Panels 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM

From Needs to Pages: Creating Canadian EAP Materials

Workshops 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM

Multimodalities-Entextualisation Cycle (MEC) as a Heuristic Tool in Critical EAP

Working with Sources: Connecting Textual Features to Suitability

10:45 AM – 11:00 AM

Coffee Break

11:00 AM – 11:30 AM

Breakout Sessions 2

Paper Presentations 11:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Teachers’ Perceptions of Plurilingual Instruction in an EAP Program

Empowering EAP Students as Discourse Analysts of Science Communication

Contextualizing E-Portfolio Experience With In-and-Out Perspective: A Comparative Study Between Phillippines and India

Transcurriculing EAP Courses

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM

Lunch

1:15 PM – 2:15 PM

Opening Plenary

Changing from Deficit Models to Asset-based Models in Academic Literacies Pedagogies in Higher Education: Replacing Monoglossic Language Beliefs with Heteroglossic Language Beliefs

Angel M. Y. Lin, Simon Fraser University

2:30 PM – 3:45 PM

Breakout Sessions 3

Paper Presentations 1 2:30 PM - 3:00 PM

Starting From Scratch: Designing a Brand-New EAP Program

Defining “Good Writing”: Ideology in Canadian University Language Policy

Paper Presentations 2 3:15 PM - 3:45 PM

Investigating the Effects of Reducing Linguistic Complexity in First-Year Assessments

Making the Mechanics of Paraphrasing Explicit through Grammatical Metaphor

Panels 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM

TESL Ontario’s College/University Committee: Sharing the Vision

Workshops 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM

Authentic Expression in Teaching Academic Discussion Skills

EAP for Lower-Proficiency Students: 10 Effective Teaching Techniques

3:45 PM – 4:00 PM

Coffee Break

4:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Plenary

Charting the Canadian Post-Secondary English for Academic Purposes Landscape

James Corcoran, York University
Julia Williams, Renison University College, University of Waterloo

5:00 PM – 7:00 PM

Cocktail Reception

Day 2 - Saturday, May 30

9:00 AM

Registration Starts

Breakfast

9:30 AM – 10:45 AM

Paper Presentations 1 9:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Longitudinal Experiences of Acculturation Over One Academic Year

Paper Presentations 2 10:15 AM - 10:45 AM

Student Experiences in a First-Year Canadian Pathway Program

Workshops 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM

Ungrammatical? Maybe It Just Ain’t So

Academic Reading Circles for Collaborative Reading and Writing

Commenting on Evidence: Developing Student Ability to Integrate Source Material

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Poster Presentations

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM

Lunch

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM

Closing Plenary

Factors Affecting International Postsecondary Students’ Mental Health and Academic Achievement

Eunice Eunhee Jang, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto

Paper Presentations

A Native English-Speaking Teacher’s Plurilingual Practice: Tensions and Agency at a Korean University

 

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 1
Friday, 10:15 AM – 10:45 AM

Authors

John McGaughey, International Foundation Program, University of Toronto

Abstract

This paper reports on the cross-linguistic teaching practices of a native Englishspeaking teacher (NEST) at a university in South Korea. Framed through the lenses of Vygotskian sociocultural theory (Vygotsky, 1978) and activity theory (Engeström, 1987, 1993; Leontev, 1981) the paper situates the NEST’s practices, and relatedly agency, in Korea’s cultural-historic English language
teaching context where English-only medium of instruction (MoI) policies and related ideologies are dominant while viewing the NEST as an ontogenetic subject inclusive of her language learning and English language teaching experiences. The analysis reveals that the NEST’s use of spoken Korean is constrained due to tensions associated with an assumed de facto MOI, her identity as a NEST, and fear of confusing her students. Yet, the NEST, in resolution to theses tensions, turns to the use of Korean in cross-linguistic PowerPoint slides with her lower proficiency students. This agentive use of Korean, in turn, serves many of the same functions as studies have found related to teachers’ plurilingual teaching practices (e.g. Ferguson, 2003; Hall & Cook, 2012; Lin, 2013; Littlewood & Yu, 2011; Turnbull & Arnett, 2002). The paper concludes with implications for language policy planners, program and curriculum developers, and, in line with recommendations from researchers (e.g. Corcoran, 2015; Cummins, 2007; García & Kleyn, 2016), advocates for the continued incorporation of learners’ first languages in English language teaching.

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Contextualizing E-Portfolio Experience with In-and-Out Perspective: A Comparative Study Between Philippines and India

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 2
Friday, 11:00 AM – 11:30 AM


Authors

Mayur Agravat, College of Continuing Education, ESL Department, Dalhousie University

Abstract

E-portfolios, as a caterpillar tool, usage have been one of the reflective mechanisms to measure and assess the learning outcomes while studying English for Academic Purposes. Some renowned higher education institutions embolden the usage of e-portfolios to necessitate the formative-and-summative assessment. The current research examined the learning outcomes based on the application of e-portfolios in the academic system of the renowned university of the Philippines, versus four different academic institutions in India where the concept of e-portfolio has never been introduced. The data has been collected by post-study evaluation. Around 50 undergraduates, from five different programs, at the university, reflected that e-portfolio helped them in measuring and improving their learning experiences. More than 75% acknowledged that eportfolios facilitated reflections, gaps, formative development throughout learning. On the other side, in India, learners showed a lack of awareness about the usage of e-portfolios. Almost 60 undergraduates, belonged to different institutions, agreed that they do not have e-portfolios as a tool that record their learning from entry-to-exit level. More than 78% students argued that the current education system emphasis more on the summative assessment. Moreover, more than 60% opined that the system needs a massive change to monitor outcome-based-assessment. Nearly, 74% respondents recognized e-portfolios as a reflective tool that may bring a better performance-based-evaluation. The overall result of the survey presents and concludes the effectiveness of eportfolio usage as a potential tool to gauge learning development from pre-topost level. The further sections of the paper will give a broader analysis of the research.

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Defining “Good Writing”: Ideology in Canadian University Language Policy

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 3
Friday, 2:30 PM – 3:00 PM

Author

Jennifer MacDonald, ESL Programs, Dalhousie University

 

Abstract

The textual characteristics of good academic writing are communicated via language policies at many universities. Correction keys, marking codes, grading criteria or rubrics at the course, departmental, faculty or institutional level guide writing teaching and assessment. These descriptions of good writing on the lexical, grammatical and organizational level are not neutral, however; in many cases they embody covert attitudes and ideologies around “writtenness” (Turner, 2018) that place value on a specific type of academic writing. In the plurality of Englishes thriving in the linguistically-diverse setting of the contemporary Anglophone Canadian university, these policies around “good writing” often centre certain Englishes while marginalizing others. Drawing on a case study of
a discursive analysis of piece of language policy from a Canadian university, in this session, participants will critically examine commonly-held definitions of “good writing” and the covert attitudes and ideologies that influence how we teach and evaluate academic writing in linguistically-diverse higher education settings.

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Empowering EAP Students as Discourse Analysts of Science Communication

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 2
Friday, 11:00 AM – 11:30 AM

Authors

Jodie Martin, Vantage College, University of British Columbia

Greta Perris, Language & Literacy Education, University of British Columbia

Kelly Shoecraft, Vantage College, University of British Columbia

 

Abstract

The internationalization of the university system in Canada demands support to give students access to the valued forms of academic language. However, courses increasingly reach beyond formal academic texts to provide students with a range of ‘accessible’ content. This paper presents an innovative way to give students access to disciplinary-specific language for the purposes of writing and assessment, as well as awareness of language use beyond traditional academic pursuits. By conducting independent discourse analysis, students are empowered to move forward as independent and discerning language users, and as science communicators.

This paper reports on the expansion and consolidation of a discourse analysis focus in a research writing course for first year international students. It demonstrates how students were able to choose topics and texts of interest and compare language use in formal academic texts, such as journal articles and textbooks, with modern texts for a more general audience, such as TED talks
and wikipedia articles. Specifically, it will present an Academic Register Framework (Martin et al, in preparation) which explicitly scaffolds students’ ability to interpret the variable use of language features in their texts and can further be used as a scaffold for writing.

 

It will be argued that conducting discourse analysis themselves enables students to see language use as a series of choices made according to purpose and audience, and that this empowers students to transfer the grammatical knowledge gained from EAP courses to new texts and new disciplines as they continue their studies.

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Greening the Curriculum: Addressing Climate Crisis in the EAP Classroom

 

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 1
Friday, 9:30 AM – 10:00 AM

Authors

Jonathan Luke, School of Deaf and Deafblind Studies, George Brown College

Maya Samson, English Language Centre, Humber College

 

 

Abstract

Over the last few decades, scholarship in critical applied linguistics has brought increased attention to social dimensions of language learning, shedding light on how problems related to gender and sexual orientation, religion, race, class and global population flows manifest both in and out of the language classroom. Many of these concerns have been picked up by practitioners and stakeholders
such as textbook designers, often resulting in increased sensitivity and reflection on these issues. A related topic that has not received as much coverage in EAP is the current global climate crisis. Taking inspiration from scholars and practitioners who aim to address social issues, this presentation draws on recent scholarship in applied linguistics and sociolinguistics arguing for greater inclusion of language sciences in conversations on climate crisis (Costa, 2019: Pennycook, 2018), and considers how we can better prepare our students for the real challenges in their communities and as global citizens in relation to global heating. Using an example of a single unit in a commonly used EAP textbook, we demonstrate a number of strategies for adapting suggested lesson
plans and classroom activities to foreground concerns about the current climate crisis, and ongoing and developing related social justice issues.

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Instantiations of Multiliteracies Pedagogy in the EAP Course Classroom

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 1
Friday, 10:15 AM – 10:45 AM

Authors

Heejin Song, Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, York University

 

 

Abstract

Adopting transformative multiliteracies pedagogy (Cummins & Early, 2011), this paper showcases how the interdisciplinary EAP course classroom became a site of educational praxis through critical action research (CAR). In CAR, teaching practice evolves through reflective dialogues and collaboration between teachers and/or between teachers and learners in a spiral and cyclical manner toward a critically-oriented understanding of the content. A semester-long multiliteraciesenhanced academic vocabulary acquisition project invited students to present their understandings of the meanings and usages of academic words. Students’
increased engagement in class activities through the multimodal vocabulary projects influenced the instructional design of a second project, the Canadian Culture Presentation that aimed at developing academic research skills and intercultural competence. Students were asked to present their understandings of Canadian culture and identity in a multimodal form based on class readings
and other sources from their research as well as reflections on their own culture. The preponderance in students’ presentation centered around celebratory images and messages of Canadian culture and identity, reflecting liberal multiculturalism and essentialist understanding of culture and identity. This observation informed the adoption of multimodal identity texts for students to
explore the complex and multilayered concept of culture and identity. Students were asked to reflect on their own language, culture and identity as well as how their linguistic and cultural identities influence their learning of English. The paper concludes by highlighting the role of critical action research and transformative multiliteracies pedagogy in EAP teaching practice to empower students to become co-constructors of knowledge building.

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Investigating the Effects of Reducing Linguistic Complexity in First-Year Assessments

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 3
Friday, 3:15 PM – 3:45 PM

Authors

Daniel Riccardi, Academic English Program, University of British Columbia

Jennifer Lightfoot, Vantage College, University of British Columbia

 

 

Abstract

Academic writing across disciplines is often linguistically complex, characterized by abstract ideas densely packed into nominal groups (Biber & Gray, 2010; Halliday & Martin, 1993; McCabe & Gallagher, 2008), along with infrequent lexis and content requiring specific cultural knowledge. This linguistic complexity can present significant comprehension challenges for novice students (Abedi &
Gandara, 2006). This presentation focuses on how collaborations between Psychology, Sociology, and EAP instructors has led to greater awareness of the comprehension challenges that assessments pose for students, particularly in the case of multiple choice question (MCQ) exams. To investigate the effects of linguistic complexity, the research team analyzed whether modifying the
language of MCQ improves comprehension for novice students.

The data come from two different first-year student populations within a Canadian Arts university program – students who are admitted directly to the university and academically strong students who do not meet the English language requirements of the university and are enrolled in a pathway program that embeds academic language and literacy instruction. Our findings indicate
that both our pathway program students and their direct-entry peers are more likely to score higher on linguistically modified assessment questions, highlighting the importance of unpacking dense language in assessments to provide linguistic space for novice students to demonstrate their knowledge of disciplinary content. We conclude by reflecting on potential collaboration and
professional development opportunities presented within Content and Language Integrated contexts for EAP and disciplinary instructors in the effort to design more effective assessments that meet students’ linguistic needs.

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Longitudinal Experiences of Acculturation Over One Academic Year

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 4
Saturday, 9:30 AM – 10:00 AM

Authors

Bruce Russell, International Programs, University of Toronto

Karen Englander,  International Programs, University of Toronto

 

 

Abstract

One paradigm for understanding students’ success or difficulty when they study outside of their home country is acculturation, i.e. “the dual process of cultural and psychological change that takes place as a result of contact between two or more cultural groups and their individual members” (Barry, 2005, p. 698).

In this presentation, we report on a longitudinal study on the experiences of approximately 200 plurilingual students enrolled in an English for Academic Purposes bridging program at a major Canadian university. We sought to understand the students’ perceived relationship between their first language and home culture vs their additional language English and the host culture. We applied two validated measures of acculturative stress (Sandhu & Asrabadi, 1998, de Silva, 2018) and acculturation orientation (Barry, 2005, de Silva, 2018) at the beginning and end points of the academic year. Orientation is categorized as Assimilation, Integration, Separation and Marginalization (Sullivan & Kashubeck-West, 2015). It is hypothesized that Integration, which indicates the student considers it valuable to maintain one’s own cultural identity and relationships with the host culture, is correlated with the lowest levels of stress.
The results allow us to identify international students’ experiences of living and studying in Canada and determine whether the EAP program had an impact on those experiences. We argue that students whose sense of alignment with the host culture can be identified as marginalized, separate, acculturated or assimilated also experience stress differently. The results have implications for
how host institutions can better serve their incoming international students.

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Making the Mechanics of Paraphrasing Explicit Through Grammatical Metaphor

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 3
Friday, 3:15 PM – 3:45 PM

Authors

Jennifer Walsh Marr, Vantage College, University of British Columbia

 

 

Abstract

Paraphrasing is a nebulous yet high-stakes practice for emerging writers, particularly those who are still developing their linguistic repertoires. Often, teaching materials for paraphrasing focus on vocabulary expansion and superficial advice to make grammatical changes, without sufficient analysis and practice of what those grammatical changes entail and where best to deploy
them.

 

This praxis presentation expands on Keck’s (2010) analysis of the discrete grammatical processes typical of successful paraphrasing through the lens of Systemic Functional Linguistics’ concept of Grammatical Metaphor (Halliday, 2009). After unpacking the concept and manifestations of Grammatical Metaphor, those shifts in form within and across clause functions are demonstrated and explained, then expanded in teaching materials designed to support first year-university writing students working in English as an additional language.

Moving beyond situating paraphrasing as an issue of academic honesty and linguistic insufficiency (Abasi, Akvari & Graves, 2006; Currie, 1998; Pecorari, 2003; Pecorari & Shaw, 2012), this research-informed praxis demystifies some of the concrete grammatical changes that occur as part of paraphrasing, and positions the practice as a tool for learning. Further, this paper will demonstrate
how highlighting functional metalanguage can break the process of paraphrasing into more explicit moves for instructional benefit and facilitate students’ development of valued practices within their academic disciplines.

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Starting from Scratch: Designing a Brand-New EAP Program

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 3
Friday, 2:30 PM – 3:00 PM

 

Authors

Tania Pattison, Freelance

 

 

Abstract

To a freelance EAP writer, the job advertisement was enticing: design a brandnew EAP program for a postsecondary institution in western Canada. The institution had only a small number of international students, but it had ambitious plans to increase that number dramatically in coming years.

Once the job offer was made, I set about planning this two-level program from a distance. I had no current program to build on and improve, and there was no specified textbook or other materials, but I was given a list of skills and topics that the client would like to see included.

This talk outlines how I went about designing this course from scratch. I will share my process of establishing a framework, determining and writing course content, and deciding upon assessment tools. I will discuss some of the questions I had to consider: Who are the potential students? What are their needs likely to be? How much time should be allocated to each component of
the course? Should components be integrated or separated? Should I incorporate a textbook? Where does learning about Canadian academic culture fit in? To what extent should my materials be region-specific? How much work can (or should) be done online? How could I balance general EAP skills with ESAP skills?

I will show how I approached those questions and how I arrived at suitable answers. This session is likely to be of interest to participants planning either to design a new EAP course or to modify an existing one.

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Student Experiences in a First-Year Canadian Pathway Program

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 4
Saturday, 10:15 AM – 10:45 AM

 

Authors

Sandra Zappa-Hollman, Vantage College, University of British Columbia

Joanne Fox, Vantage College, University of British Columbia

 

Abstract

Internationalization strategies in Canada coupled with global student mobility trends have fueled the influx of international students across post-secondary institutions in our country (Anderson, 2017), prompting universities and colleges to explore a programmatic options to attract qualified students and best prepare them to transition to the Canadian (primarily) English-medium teaching and
learning contexts. In this presentation, we report on the findings of a 5-year program evaluation study of a Canadian university pathway program for international students that offers enriched first year undergraduate programming (Bachelor of Arts, Engineering, and Science). The following overarching questions guided our investigation: From the students’ perspectives, what program features and aspects best support their academic socialization, language development, and integration to the host context? How can the
program be improved? Data were collected through surveys completed by 1145 participants (67% of registered students), which were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. We also gained deeper insights about particular program features and aspects through a discourse analysis of focus groups and interviews with a sub-group of students from each cohort. After providing key information regarding the unique features of our program, which integrates language and content instruction drawing on Systemic Functional Linguistics (Halliday, 1994) and concludes with a Capstone research conference, we will report the main findings of our study, showing also how our program evaluation results have informed ongoing adjustments across many program aspects (i.e., curriculum, pedagogy, resources). This session will be of special interest to administrators and faculty involved in supporting international multilingual postsecondary students.

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Teachers’ Perceptions of Plurilingual Instruction in an EAP Program

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 2
Friday, 11:00 AM – 11:30 AM

 

Authors

Nermine Abd Elkader, International Foundation Program, University of Toronto

Angelica Galante, Department of Integrated Studies in Education, McGill University

Kerstin Sandstrom Okubo, International Foundation Program, University of Toronto

Christina Cole, International Foundation Program, University of Toronto

Nicola Carozza, International Foundation Program, University of Toronto

Claire Wilkinson, English School of Canada

 

Abstract

Several calls have been made for a plurilingual shift in language teaching and learning, including EAP programs, in countries where classrooms are linguistically and culturally diverse like Canada. However, teachers may still be unsure about how to apply plurilingual
pedagogy in the classroom. Moreover, there remains a paucity of studies investigating the disconnect between the theory and implementation of the plurilingual shift. In this paper, we present results of a quasi-experimental study that addressed these challenges by implementing plurilingual instruction in one EAP program in a Canadian university and examining teachers’ perceptions of this type of instruction compared to English-only. This was a teacher-researcher collaboration in which seven teachers taught two groups of students with different approaches: one group received plurilingual instruction while the other group received English-only instruction. Results of classroom observations and semi-structured interviews with the teachers show several affordances of plurilingual instruction such as engaging students in language learning, advancing agentive power, and developing a safe space. Moreover, while none of the teachers had received formal training in plurilingual pedagogy, they unanimously reported preference for this type of instruction. Challenges mainly resulted from teachers’ history with the English-only teaching tradition. We discuss the extent to which the study can serve to bridge the gap between the theory and practice of plurilingualism and make recommendations for EAP programs.

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Transcurriculing EAP Courses

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 2
Friday, 11:00 AM – 11:30 AM

 

Authors

Kerstin Sandstrom Okubo, International Foundation Program, University of Toronto

Janine Riviere,  International Foundation Program, University of Toronto

 

 

Abstract

The difficulty in facilitating programs which successfully combine content courses with support from Integrated language learning courses is an area of ongoing discussion in EAP curriculum development. This talk will introduce a summer EAP pre-sessional program with integrated course assignments between the content course and the language courses. In this program, students were required to take a discipline-specific course in History with two supporting language courses, one which focused on academic communication practices and the other on developing a broad range of transferable academic skills. Two assignments – an online discussion and course disciplinary report – straddled the three courses and contributed to student grades for all three courses. We will discuss the process, outcomes and value of these two integrated course assignments as well as evaluate the successes and
limitations. Through an evaluation of learning outcomes and instructor reflection, it will be suggested that this model works well to promote integrated language learning skills and helps ELLs to transfer language practices to discipline-specific contexts in addition to promoting student investment in EAP support courses.

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Translingual Reading in the Post-Secondary Context

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 1
Friday, 9:30 AM – 10:00 AM

Authors

Saskia Van Viegen, Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, York University

Sharuare Siddick, Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, York University

 

Abstract

Recently, applied linguists have theorized translanguaging and translingual practice (García & Li, 2014; Li, 2018; Otheguy et al, 2015), to conceptualize how, for bi/multilingual language users, ongoing processes of thinking and meaning making take place beyond the boundaries of named languages, and how individuals assemble and mobilize their linguistic and semiotic resources according to particular needs and situations (Coste, Moore & Zarate, 1997/2009; Lüdi & Py, 2009). To date, translanguaging studies have largely focused on classroom pedagogical processes. However, translanguaging as a meaning-making process also takes
place during literacy activities. Knowledge in this arena is critically important both to support the disciplinary teaching and learning bi/multilingual students, and to generate theories and models of reading that reflect current understandings of bi/multilingualism as translanguaging/translingual practice. Rather than examining differences between L1/L2 reading, the present study examines bi/multilingual students’ biliteracy, and the flexible, dynamic integration of linguistic and processing skills involved in seeing reading as a translingual process (Garcia, Bartlett, & Kleifgen, 2007).

Engaging with these considerations, the proposed paper draws on a project situated in a large Canadian post-secondary institution, exploring bi/multilingual undergraduate students’ reading processes. Data included faculty and student interviews, student work samples, andstudent performance on reading assessment tasks together with think-aloud data on students’ reading and thinking processes. Broadly, the study shows evidence of translanguaging not only in classroom pedagogical processes, but also in the meaning-making and comprehension involved in reading. Implications for supporting bi/multilingual student reading, particularly disciplinary content, in undergraduate degree programs will be discussed.

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Panels

From Needs to Pages: Creating Canadian EAP Materials

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 1
Friday, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM

 

Panelists

Julia Williams, Renison University College, University of Waterloo

Jennifer MacDonald, Dalhousie University

Steve Marshall, Simon Fraser University

Ken Beatty, Anaheim University

 

Abstract

How are professional language learning materials created? Four Canadian textbook writers in the area of English for Academic Purposes outline their paths to becoming writers, and their processes of needs assessment, idea development, writing practice, and working with publishers. With audience participation, this moderated panel discussion will debate many issues including questions around the necessity of textbooks, the authenticity of materials, the roles of teacher-authored materials, challenges of localization, support for teachers, and digital resources that complement or replace the traditional textbook (Charles & Pecorari, 2016; Meddings & Thornbury, 2009; Tomlinson, 2012). This session will be of particular interest to teachers who question the role of textbooks, as well as those who are eager to publish their own materials.

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TESL Ontario’s College/University Committee: Sharing the Vision

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 3
Friday, 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM

Panelists

Lara McInnis, Humber College

Geoff Lawrence, York University

James Papple, York University

Angela Meyer Sterzik, Fanshawe College

 

Abstract

In Canada between 2001 and 2010 the number of international post-secondary students increased approximately 10.4% annually with international students accounting for 21.8% in advanced research programs (Statistics Canada, 2014). This intense internationalization has fuelled the growth of post-secondary ESL/EAP programs with linguistic and technological needs that often differ from community ESL programs, thereby expanding the duties of and demands on English language teachers in these contexts. This increasing body of international students is also considered a pool of future permanent residents of “young and well-educated individuals” (Statistics Canada, 2017). 25% of all international students from the early 2000s acquired permanent residency within
the next decade (Statistics Canada, 2017). In addition to teaching English, teachers in the post-secondary sector are also required to act as agents of academic acculturation and social inclusion.

In response to these growing, emerging post-secondary sectors, in 2018 TESL Ontario launched a new Working Committee to examine the English language teaching needs and professional development of members working in the college and university sectors. This panel discussion will feature four speakers from this committee discussing: an overview of the current state of Ontario’s
post-secondary ELT sector; the history and the rationale of this committee’s formation; the strategic plan of this committee. The panel will then highlight and elicit, through an interactive discussion, the emerging issues and needs of English language teachers working in these sectors from participants. The panel will conclude with ways to engage with this committee in the future.

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Workshops

Academic Reading Circles for Collaborative Reading and Writing

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 4
Saturday, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM

 

Presenter

Tyson SeburnInternational Foundation Program, University of Toronto

Abstract

Academic reading circles (ARC) combines individual and collaborative activities to transform learner struggles with challenging texts into stronger engagement and deeper comprehension. Through exemplars, we will examine the five roles (Leader, Visualiser,
Contextualiser, Connector, Highlighter), which combine individual reading skills practice and group discussion to negotiate text meaning. From here, we’ll look at practical techniques to handle realistic class issues: facilitating discussions of the text through digital annotations; improving learner-generated role handouts; and checking comprehension while keeping learners accountable through collaborative writing on Google Docs. While intended for English for Academic purposes contexts, ARC can be adapted for a general EFL classroom.

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Commenting on Evidence: Developing Student Ability to Integrate Source Material

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 4
Saturday, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM

 

Presenters

Tracy Manning, International Foundation Program, University of Toronto

Cat Ionescu, International Foundation Program, University of Toronto

Abstract

EAP instructors struggle with how to help students integrate evidence from sources into their academic writing. This may be attributed to the fact that this skill is not adequately addressed in EAP pedagogy, which results in difficulty teaching this essential academic skill. To raise both instructor and student awareness we used an evidence-based approach to identify the different types
of comments found in authentic academic texts. In this talk, we introduce a classification of six distinct types of comments we have identified (introduction, connection, evaluation, causation, clarification, and conclusion). First, we briefly situate the need for a pedagogical tool that makes explicit the skill of commenting on source evidence in our Critical Reading & Writing course for first
year international students at the University of Toronto. Next, we present our classification of comment types visually organised to represent the increasing degree of critical thinking needed to generate each type of comment. We explain how this table is a useful teaching tool that includes guiding questions and prompts to help instructors understand and learners to generate these comments, and we provide an exemplar to illustrate how these types of comments can be identified within an academic text. We conclude with a
timeline for incorporating commenting on evidence lessons into an EAP syllabus.

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EAP for Lower-Proficiency Students: 10 Effective Teaching Techniques

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 3
Friday, 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM

 

Presenter

Jeremy Phillips, The Institute for Tourism Studies, Macau

Abstract

In a perfect world, language learners would start working on academic literacy skills after they have medial language proficiency level (CEFR B2 or higher) in their language of study. In reality, institutional structures, market demand or local conditions often require learners to start studying academic English much earlier in their language development. Teachers are often expected to help develop
academic literacy and scholastic skills in students who have not yet had the chance to build a strong foundation of language proficiency.

This workshop will focus on the classroom practices for effectively teaching EAP to lower proficiency students in time-limited contexts. This session will explore techniques and approaches for improving language skills and knowledge at the same time as developing the academic literacy skills which are key to EAP. Participants will try out methods of personalizing academic text-types and increasing student buy-in. Workshop activities will be based on research into academic English usage, writing in the digital age and EAP assessment structures to help front-line teachers make EAP more accessible and relevant to lower-proficiency learners. In addition, some aspects of materials design and adaptation related to teaching and developing academic literacy skills will be
shared so that participants can knowledgeably select and alter their teaching materials in the future.

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Multimodalities – Entextualisation Cycle as a Heuristic Tool in Critical EAP

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 1
Friday, 9:30 PM – 10:45 AM

 

Presenter

Phoebe Siu, Hong Kong Community College, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Abstract

In Critical EAP (Pennycook, 1994; Benesch, 2012), students’ criticality and creativity are valued, along with academic literacy. This workshop demonstrates how technology-mediated classroom teaching and learning may play a key role in Critical EAP. The workshop begins with introducing the Multimodalities- Entextualistion Cycle (MEC) (Lin, 2016; 2019) as a curriculum genre and
heuristic tool to provide culturally-embraced scaffolding to students with multilingual and multicultural backgrounds. Upon building up a clear understanding of the MEC, workshop participants will then be guided to work in groups to design teaching materials along the three stages of the MEC. At Stage 1, workshop participants are guided to create a contextualised hook to capture students’ curiosity and interaction through multimodalities, familiar socio-cultural and language resources. At Stage 2, collaborative efforts are used to co-create ample scaffolds for students, including teacher-student dialogic/ interactive scaffolds and peer-to-peer dialogic/ interactive scaffolds to support students’ fluid access to the target content/ knowledge/ language addressed in an academic text. Finally, at Stage 3, teachers and students are guided to entextualise (turn Stage 1-2 learning experience into a text), using the target academic language (with ample L1/L2 writing/ speaking scaffolds) to meet authoritative academic assessment standards through developing a critical and collaborative approach to EAP. This workshop provides materials design templates and teaching examples for workshop participants to reflect on how to build up a “more inclusive and context dependent models of language” (Mahboob and Lin, 2016, p. 9) through the MEC (Lin, 2016; 2019) and Critical EAP (Pennycook, 1994; Benesch, 2012).

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Authentic Expression in Teaching Academic Discussion Skills

 Presentation Time

Breakout Session 3
Friday, 2:30 PM – 3:45 PM

Presenter

Pamela DownieMount Royal University

Abstract

Teaching discussion skills is often challenging in the EAP classroom because the resulting discourse can seem overly rehearsed and linguistically limited.  We ask students to engage in discussion, yet it is hard to guide these exchanges in ways that encourage growth in learner’s expressive repertoire.  This interactive workshop will share the experience of one instructor who gave up looking for authenticity in published materials and chose instead to develop original materials that provide guidance, challenge and context for learners who are entering first year credit courses.  Be ready to create some of your own original texts to share with students.

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Ungrammatical? Maybe It Just Ain’t So

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 4
Saturday, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM

Presenter

Brett Reynolds, Humber College

Abstract

Each of us has a sense of what is grammatical and what is not, but rarely are we explicity aware of what that is based on. When we say that something is ungrammatical “strictly speaking”, what kind of claim are we making? And when we determine that something is ungrammatical, what effects does that have on students, co-workers, and society more generally? Using examples and
judgements from the participants, we will try to sort through these issues.

 

Successful participants will be able to take a more empirical approach to determining grammaticality. They will more accurately distinguish between dialectal differences and grammatical errors. They will compare the effects of studying in an academic environment with people who can make these distinctions to studying in one with people who cannot.

 

The particular issues we examine will be drawn from examples that participants suggest. Participants will be asked to judge grammaticality at various stages in the analysis.

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Working with Sources: Connecting Textual Features to Suitability

Presentation Time

Breakout Session 1
Friday, 9:30 AM – 10:45 AM

 

Presenter

Jennifer Walsh Marr, Vantage College, University of British Columbia

 

Abstract

Academic work typically requires the inclusion of properly incorporated (situated, paraphrased and cited) research literature, but English for Academic courses don’t always adequately deal with supporting EAL and international students with the process of choosing literature appropriate to their assignments. Beyond outsourcing the research process to academic libraries (who may or may not adequately support students with developing language skills), this workshop shares student-facing materials that facilitate assessing the suitability of research materials to support academic writing. Beginning with comprehensive criteria for assessing the suitability of resources, this workshop will apply a suitability framework to a curated selection of topical research content, making explicit connections between various textual features, purposes and discrete linguistic features to the suitability criteria. Participants will have the opportunity to work individually or in small groups to discuss, deploy and/or adapt the presented materials to their own pedagogical context. By the end of the workshop, participants will have a pedagogical framework and rationale for analyzing source material, a student-facing assessment framework with multiple entry points, and the process for curating a selection of resources should they want to adapt those provided to their own teaching contexts.

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Poster Presentations

Blended ESP for Internationally-Educated Legal Professionals: Building the Foundation

Presentation Time

Poster Presentations
Saturday, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Presenters

Yuliya Miakisheva, English Language Institute, York University

Kareen Sharaway, English Language Institute, York University

 

Abstract

As the levels of skilled workers immigration to Canada increase, so do the levels of internationally-trained legal professionals, many of whom aspire to get accredited in their profession and seek employment in the legal field in Canada. However, with the exceptional professional talent the internationally-trained lawyers offer to the legal profession, many encounter a number of challenges of the linguistic and socio-cultural nature.

To address these challenges, York University English Language Institute (YUELI), in collaboration with the Osgoode Hall Law School Professional Development (OPD) in Toronto, Canada, designed and successfully delivered the part-time blended Intensive Advanced Legal English Program (IALE.pt). The encompassing objective of the IALE.pt is to equip its participants, the non-native-English-speaking individuals with education and/or experience in the legal sphere, with competence in a set of communication tasks that will help them build the foundation for success in academic and legal contexts. The program is delivered in a blended format, with face-to-face instruction and online instruction including the virtual classroom component arranged via video conferencing with an instructor from overseas.

In this poster presentation, the presenters will introduce the IALE.pt program and present samples of materials developed to address the needs of the internationally-trained lawyers outlined by their academic programs and challenges they encounter on professional and linguistic levels. The presenters will also discuss successful strategies implemented to overcome those challenges, prepare the internationally-trained lawyers for academic and professional success, and advocate autonomous learning.

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Blended Learning to Optimize Teamwork

Presentation Time

Poster Presentations
Saturday, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Presenter

Agnieszka WolczukRenison University College, York University

Maria Pop, Renison University College, York University

 

Abstract

Quite often, the online aspect of blended learning in EAP classes is centred on student individual work and instructor presentation of material outside the classroom. However, students need to be prepared to work on a team in their future workplaces. During this workshop, we will present a variety of technologies to show that blended learning, when used for group work rather than individual work, can give students the opportunity to develop teamwork and communication skills.

We will begin our workshop by testing the participants’ understanding of the term “blended learning” with a Kahoot quiz. The quiz will be followed by a brainstorming session on technological tools and platforms helpful in creating a blended learning environment. This task, aimed at exchanging ideas, will be completed on a Padlet board, an application used to develop online bulletin boards. Some other functionalities of Padlet boards as well as suggestions for optimizing such boards in the EAP classroom will be presented. Subsequently, we will share a few ways in which Google Slides have been used in our oral communication classes to encourage teamwork in and outside the classroom.

Knowing that there is a plethora of technology tools/platforms to promote blended learning, we will conclude the workshop with a team task. Each group will share how they could use such tools to facilitate group work in and outside their classrooms. By the end of the session, we hope the participants will have selected some means to further enhance their students’ learning face-to-face and online.

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Continuing Professional Development for Seasoned Mid-Career EAP Teachers

Presentation Time

Poster Presentations
Saturday, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Presenter

Scott Jamieson, English Langauge Programs, University of Guelph

Nataliya Borkovska, English Language Programs, University of Guelph

 

Abstract

Within the competency framework elaborated by the British Association of Lecturers of Lecturers in English for Academic Purposes (BALEAP), a commitment to Continuing Professional Development (CPD) enhances the work of EAP teachers as skilled academic practitioners. CPD is best understood as part of a personal, autonomous (self-directed), and multi-faceted process of formal/informal activities and events within, or beyond, the staffroom and the classroom (Borg, 2015). Having spent considerable time assembling their essential “teaching toolkits,” mid-career EAP teachers may now wonder what CPD opportunities meet institutional goals for professional development, improve student outcomes, and promote their own growth as professionals. This poster presents CPD activities commonly undertaken by seasoned mid-career EAP teachers to refine classroom teaching (viz. British Council, 2017), explores external accreditation professional pathways, such as BALEAP’s Teaching English for Academic Purposes scheme, and recommends exploring the personal learning and wellness opportunities offered through one’s own institution.

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Corrective Feedback and Teaching Grammar at EAP Classes

Presentation Time

Poster Presentations
Saturday, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Presenter

Azadeh Zohourian Pordel, ICEAP, King’s College Campus

Abstract

Corrective feedback can be used to improve fluency and learning autonomy in delivering complex grammar. This overview focused on the difference between mistake and error and how corrective feedback can reduce the number of grammatical mistakes made at EAP classes. Another aspect which was under focus was the familiarity of the students with their teacher’s feedback method as was mentioned by Sato & Loewen (2018). Further the effect of recast was shown being effective in this regards. Finally, the explicit grammar teaching in EAP classes was another crucial factor in improving fluency and it had a great impact on students’ autonomy.

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Cultivating Critical Thought in EAP Using Logos, Pathos, and Ethos

Presentation Time

Poster Presentations
Saturday, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Presenter

Rebecca Pearson-Fischer, International Foundation Program, University of Toronto

Alice Kim, International Foundation Program, University of Toronto

 

Abstract

Critical thinking has been a catchphrase of EAP for some time, but questions remain about how to best cultivate it in the classroom. Critical thinking requires students to question, analyse, and evaluate information. It presents a pedagogical challenge to EAP instructors who have approached it in many creative ways with varying results. We propose that an understanding of Aristotle’s three rhetorical appeals of logos, pathos, and ethos will equip students with a useful framework to guide their critical reading and writing in
EAP and within university contexts, as well as provide opportunities to learn new academic vocabulary. Our goal is to help students distinguish between the three different rhetorical appeals and eventually use them to improve their reading comprehension and writing. After an introductory lesson, students will conduct a guided analysis of class readings on the basis of the three components.
Following continued practice with this analysis, they will be asked to utilize what they have learned in their writing, as well as participate in related peer-editing activities. Students will be asked to refer to the rhetorical framework throughout the term and to keep this in mind as they compose their final papers. At the end of the term, students will be surveyed on how effectively an understanding of logos, pathos, and ethos helped them navigate complex texts and produce effective persuasive writing. The data results of four classes will be shared to evaluate the effects of this rhetorical lens on students’ critical thinking.

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Negotiating Intercultural Citizenship in an EAP Setting

Presentation Time

Poster Presentations
Saturday, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Presenter

Claire Cavanagh, The English School of Canada

Sophia Kim, The English School of Canada

 

Abstract

In the current era of internationalization, higher education institutions, including those in Canada, are explicit in their aims to develop global citizens (Jenkins, 2014; Cavanagh, 2017). EAP responds to these aims by widening the objective of EAP study to include a focus on intercultural competence (Hyland, 2006). Despite such worthy objectives, research into the connection between intercultural competence and EAP is rather lacking (Douglas & Rosvold, 2018). Through a framework of intercultural citizenship (Byram, 2008), our proposed research project will make a necessary contribution to EAP literature by providing an insight into how students in an EAP pathway program are negotiating and developing an intercultural identity and how their EAP experiences in Canada are contributing to this identity construction. The research will also continue as the students complete their first month of university, allowing us to observe how their intercultural identities have ultimately been shaped by their experiences. The research will take an interpretive, qualitative approach which allows for an in-depth examination of issues while avoiding generalisations. We will be conducting semi-structured, qualitative interviews and focus groups with ten participants over the next four months. A small sample size will allow us to investigate the range of subjectivity inherent in identity research. Following this, the data will be analysed over a three-month period and once results are obtained, a presentation will be prepared outlining our rationale, previous literature which informs the study, methodological approach and results. Our presentation will end with limitations and suggestions for further research in this area.

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Nexus Analysis: Curricular, Pedagogical and Assessment Mapping through Critical EAP I

Presentation Time

Poster Presentations
Saturday, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Presenter

Phoebe Siu, Hong Kong Community College, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

 

Abstract

In Critical EAP (Pennycook, 1994; Benesch, 2009), the roles of EAP have been critically reviewed to explicate the politics of English as “a critical stance that recognizes the ways in which English is embedded in social, cultural, and political relations” (Pennycook, 1994, p. 14). This paper addresses the politics of English through investigating bilingual Design students’ access and ownership of
the target content/ knowledge/ language skills in Critical EAP. On top of using academic texts/ genres as English ‘for’ Academic Purposes, what do educators expect tertiary students to get engaged and assessed through renovating and sustaining EAP-related curricular, pedagogical and assessment cycles? To unfold the interwoven relations between engagement and assessment in Critical
EAP (Benesch, 2009), this research examines what multilingual and multimodal meaning-making resources should be co-created in an EAP course for 95 bilingual Design students in Hong Kong. This research begins by inviting Design students to sketch their multilingual and multimodal meaning-making silhouettes, i.e. (1) the Language Portraits (Busch, 2006; 2018) and then uses (2) the
Multimodalities/ Entextualisation Cycle (Lin, 2015; 2018; 2019) as a curriculum genre/ heuristic tool to expand Design students’ communicative repertories through scaffolding EAP-specific skills in handling authoritative assessment tasks, like individual research essays and group oral academic presentations. This research uses Nexus Analysis (Scollons, 2004) to get the EAP teacher-researcher ethnographically engaged, navigated and informed to change the nexus of practice through collecting data, such as student informants’ language portraits, writing samples and qualitative feedback shared in semi-structured individual interviews and focus groups.

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Self-Determination Theory of Motivation & Extensive Reading

Presentation Time

Poster Presentations
Saturday, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Presenter

Gonul Turkdogan, Niagara College

 

Abstract

Day and Bamford’s ten principles for promoting second-language (L2) extensive reading (ER) have been commended for their highly applicable practicality. However, for various reasons, assuring successful ER instruction can remain a challenging task. This surprising contrast may in part be clarified by examining the relationship between Day and Bamford’s recommendations and the factors highlighted in the Self-Determination Theory (SDT) of motivation. Day and Bamford’s ten recommendations incorporate features that can be viewed as exemplifying one or more of the three SDT components – competence, autonomy, and relatedness – which, SDT argues, should all be present in an ideally motivational environment. However, a mixed-method study of 9 adult ESL instructors (Likert scale questionnaires, plus follow-up interviews) suggested that selective adherence to some but not all dimensions of Day and Bamford’s guidance may allow SDT constituents to be unwittingly underrepresented. We therefore advise that Day and Bamford’s principles for ER instruction should be explicitly associated with the SDT framework, in order to draw practitioners’ attention as directly as possible to the full range of motivational resources available. Implications are proposed for pre-service teacher education, institutional planning, and in-service professional development.

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The Role of Positive Emotions in EAP Teacher Well-Being

Presentation Time

Poster Presentations
Saturday, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Presenter

Plamen Kushkiev, George Brown College

Abstract

In this session, the presenter explains how the Scholarly Personal Narrative (SPN), as developed by Nash & Bradley (2011), can be utilized to synthesize a personal story and lived experienced into a scholarly narrative in the context of teaching English for academic purposes (EAP) at tertiary level in Toronto. This methodology is used to garner data from a series of vignettes, which depict the
professional path, challenges and pedagogic epiphanies (Denzin, 1989) the presenter has experienced in their career as an ESL/EAP instructor. The locus of attention is placed on teacher well-being, and how certain discreet positive emotions might have an important role to play in fostering EAP teachers’ wellbeing.

The presenter will draw upon Fredrickson’s (2004; 2013) broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions to explicate, critique and draw universalizable themes from the narrative. The emerging categories of teacher emotions, positive emotions and teacher well-being will be contextualized in the existing literature in order to identify gaps in the published body of knowledge, and illuminate possible implications for the role of positive emotions in teacher wellbeing within the context of teaching EAP in higher education. The participants will be invited to contribute to the discussion based on their perceptions of emotions in their professional practice.

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Opening Plenary

Angel M. Y. Lin

 

Changing from Deficit Models to Asset-based Models in Academic Literacies Pedagogies in Higher Education: Replacing monoglossic language beliefs with heteroglossic language beliefs

Even though people may readily call Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the U.S. Anglophone countries, if we look closer at the demographic and sociolinguistic profiles of these countries, we realize that they can be said to be both Anglophone and multilingual or in some of their major cities, more multilingual than Anglophone. For instance, in some cities, English-speakers might easily be outnumbered by bilingual or multilingual speakers, as is the situation in Metro Vancouver or Toronto and it is a normal feature of these cities for people to go about their daily lives using languages other than English; this includes the corridors and classrooms of the city’s schools, universities and colleges (Marshall, 2019). That does not mean that English is not still being perceived, implemented, and perpetuated as the most important and dominant language especially in higher education settings, where the officially stipulated medium of instruction and assessment is still predominantly English. However, it does mean that the ‘English-deficit’ model of students needs to be replaced by a dialogic, intercultural education model. That is, instead of framing the issue as the students’ ‘English language problem’, this ‘student deficit’ discourse needs to be re-conceptualized as an issue of higher education instructors/ academics/ curriculum policy makers who need to have more bottom-up interculturality awareness (Collins, 2018) and intercultural communicative strategies to teach in increasingly multilingual, multicultural, multi-epistemic settings. This rapidly changing sociolinguistic and demographic profile of the society also has important implications for both workplace and academic communication and ultimately the mission/ vision of universities. In fact, there are increasingly more multilingual/ multicultural teaching, research and administrative staff (e.g. professors, instructors, teaching and research assistants) in previously largely Anglophone universities. Students, teachers, researchers and administrators alike are becoming increasingly diversified both in their cultural and linguistic backgrounds. García (2009) argues for replacing monoglossic language beliefs with heteroglossic language beliefs. Instead of treating monolingualism as the norm, heteroglossia inspires teachers and students to see multilingualism and plurilingualism as the norm and the need to learn how to communicate interculturally as a mutual responsibility of both teachers and students. So, if there is ‘a problem to fix’, it is a problem shared by all parties including professors and teaching assistants. At this historical juncture, educators need to re-visit the aims of higher education. Are we teaching students to interact with idealized native standard language speakers only? Or are we helping both teachers and students to become critical linguistic ethnographers (Van Viegen and Lau, forthcoming) who have developed critical language awareness and do not subscribe to the hierarchy of languages while at the same time being able to access the dominant linguistic resources in the institution and society (Janks, 2004)?

In this presentation, I discuss the urgency for higher education in multilingual/ multicultural societies to graduate interculturally aware, global citizens who can engage competently in intercultural settings with a diverse range of speakers without holding prejudice against their linguistic, cultural, ethnic backgrounds or worldviews. And approaching teaching with this ideological clarity is one of the key tenets of asset-based pedagogy (Expósito and Favela, 2003). I will also discuss the following urgent question: How to break through ‘either-or’ binary thinking boxes and imagine new ways of doing teaching, learning and assessment in higher education classrooms?

Plenary

James Corcoran & Julia Williams

Charting the Canadian Post-Secondary English for Academic Purposes Landscape

The growing trend of internationalization across colleges and universities has led to an increase in diverse student populations at English-medium higher education institutions globally (Altbach & de Wit, 2017; Charles & Pecorari, 2016) including Canada (McKenzie, 2018; Roessingh & Douglas, 2012; Shin & Park, 2016). With these demographic changes come demands on educational institutions to support plurilingual students using English as an additional language, not only during their transition to university-level academic programs, but also during their degree programs (Corcoran & Russell, in press; Hyland & Shaw, 2016; Thorpe, Snell, Davey-Evans & Talman, 2017). This support, embedded in English for Academic Purposes (EAP) programs, is offered in a wide range of contexts across Canadian neoliberal institutions of higher education. While there has been a recent surge in interest surrounding EAP support at post-secondary institutions in the United Kingdom (Ding & Bruce, 2017; Hadley, 2015), there has yet to be a study that charts the scope of such English language support in a Canadian context. What exactly does this EAP programming look like across Canada’s universities, colleges, and affiliated private language schools? Who are the practitioners involved in developing EAP curricula and delivering EAP instruction? Despite what appears to be an expansion of this type of language support across Canadian higher education institutions, there has yet to be a comprehensive charting of the where (e.g. physically connected to the university or not), why (preparing students for discipline-broad vs. discipline-specific program demands), how (in-program vs. pre-program; credit vs. non-credit; language vs. content and language integrated), and by whom (instructor profiles and competencies) EAP instruction is offered (Douglas, 2013). Further, according to studies investigating the political economy of EAP, such instruction is often perceived to be occurring in a semi-peripheral or semi-legitimate space, where practitioners are perceived by others (Breshears, 2019; Ding & Bruce, 2017; Hadley, 2015) and/or themselves (Douglas & Kim, 2014; MacDonald, 2016) as marginal members of the academic communities in which they operate. Again, little work has been done in a Canadian context with respect to gaining a broader understanding of EAP practitioners’ self-perceptions of legitimacy.

In response to the gaps identified in the extant literature, we are conducting a multi-phase, mixed methods investigation into EAP in Canada, where Phase One (quantitative) delineates the Canadian post-secondary EAP landscape and Phase Two (qualitative) investigates the lived experiences of representative EAP professionals across contexts and geographical regions. Following document analysis of public-facing EAP program websites, we recently surveyed college and university EAP programs and practitioners (n=476). In this presentation, we report initial results of the first comprehensive, Canada-wide EAP survey, including delineating the Canadian EAP landscape with respect to EAP program models, practitioner profiles, and professional satisfaction across sub-groups of participants (directors vs. instructors), institution type (university vs. college vs. private institute), and geographical region (BC vs. Prairie vs. Ontario vs. Quebec vs. Atlantic). Initial findings derived from descriptive statistical analysis highlight salient similarities and differences with respect to models of instruction, practitioner profiles and workloads while inferential analysis points to significant differences in practitioners’ professional satisfaction based on institution type. Adopting a critical lens, we discuss these initial findings in light of growing demand for EAP programming across neoliberal models of post-secondary institutions in Canada. We conclude our presentation with questions to be answered in the second (qualitative) phase of our investigation as well as some initial recommendations for post-secondary institutions, EAP programs, and EAP practitioners based on phase one findings. This presentation will be of interest to all those involved in the administration, direction, and delivery of instruction at EAP programs across Canadian institutions of higher education.

Closing Plenary

Eunice Eunhee Jang

 

Factors Affecting International Postsecondary Students’ Mental Health and Academic Achievement