The IFP format merges undergraduate university courses with intensive academic and language support. Designed for international students who need to improve their language, academic, and cultural proficiencies before undertaking the rigours of a full-time undergraduate degree, the IFP develops students’ skills in genuine higher education contexts. The integration of English language learning and academic support with first-year university courses facilitates specific skills development required of full-time undergraduate students at the University of Toronto.

Successful Completion of the IFP

IFP students must complete all courses, including the degree credit-course; the discipline-specific course; and the language and academic development courses. Throughout the IFP, continual assessment raises student awareness of their standing and provides opportunities to improve their performance. Those who do not successfully complete all courses will have their offers withdrawn.

During the IFP, students take the one of the courses listed below and earn one full credit towards their undergraduate degree.

FACULTY

Arts & Science
Applied Science & Engineering
Architecture, Landscape & Design
Music

Fall/Winter IFP

History Course – IFP100Y1 | Credits: 1.0
Engineering Course – APS113Y1 | Credits: 1.0
History Course – IFP100Y1 | Credits: 1.0
History Course – IFP100Y1 | Credits: 1.0

Themes in World History – IFP100/1/2Y1Y

This course surveys the development of human societies from their origins to the present using examples from across the world. Topics may include the environment; cultural development and interaction; the creation and nature of belief systems; political, economic and social structures; gender relations; and the relationship between global patterns and local developments. This course counts as one full credit within the Faculty of Arts and Science, the Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design, or the Faculty of Music.

Engineering Strategies & Practice – APS113Y1

APS113Y1 introduces and provides a framework for the design process. Students are introduced to communication as a key component of engineering practice. The course is intended to help students understand problem solving and develop communications and teamwork skills. In fall term, students learn about the process of engineering design, strategies for successful teamwork, and design for human factors, society and the environment. Building on this, the winter term introduces students to project management and the design process in greater depth. Working in teams on term-length design projects, students write a series of technical reports and give a team-based design project presentation. A mandatory course for all incoming engineering students, Engineering Strategies and Practice counts as one full credit towards first-year requirements within the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering.

Using readings, lecture content, assignments and requirements from their degree course, students learn how to interpret information presented through a variety of written and oral mediums; construct arguments supported by evidence; and present ideas in small group and tutorial environments.

Students take the following concurrent courses:

Academic Listening & Speaking – IFP010Y1

Term: Fall & Winter
Faculty: Arts & Science | Architecture, Landscape & Design | Music

This course is designed to build listening and note-taking skills as well as speaking and critical thinking skills in an authentic academic environment. Students will listen to live and recorded lectures, practice listening and decoding strategies, and work with different note-taking techniques. Students will also practice speaking in seminar discussion and presentation capacities as well as develop their spoken comprehensibility. The course also develops critical thinking, reflecting, evaluating, and problem-solving skills – essential for success in the undergraduate level within the Faculty of Arts & Sciences courses.  

Academic Listening & Speaking – IFP011Y1

Term: Fall & Winter
Faculty: Applied Science & Engineering

Academic Listening & Speaking (Engineering stream) helps students to gain confidence using English in university situations where oral communication is most important to academic and social success, including lectures, office hours, tutorial activities, seminar discussions, and extra-curricular activities. Students also learn to adapt their note-taking strategies to meet the demands of university-level work. Lectures, class discussions and assignments focus on STEM-related topics and vocabulary. As oral presentations are a common form of assessment in engineering, this course also includes intensive practice with presentation skills such as voice projection and enunciation, body language, and the use of lecture slides. 

Written English Discourse – IFP012Y1

Term: Fall & Winter
Faculty: Applied Science & Engineering

Engineering writing can be very different from the academic writing required in high school. Written English Discourse asks students to think about why and how engineers write. By analyzing authentic examples of technical and professional writing, students discover how engineers adapt their communication to different audiences and purposes, how different types of organization, content and style interact to create a wide range of genres, and how grammar and word choice confirm or alter a writer’s intended meaning. Through weekly practice, students also develop their critical reading and research skills, with professional-quality sources and proper citation required in all assignments.  

University Skills & Strategies – IFP013Y1

Term: Fall & Winter
Faculty: Applied Science & Engineering

High-performing students at Canadian universities need more than just fluent English and strong academic skills. University Skills & Strategies helps students to get the most out of their time at the Faculty of Engineering, and to begin planning for their futures as multilingual engineers in a globalized and constantly evolving society. This is a seminar course with a substantial experiential learning component, in which students are required to teach and learn from their peers, and to engage with the community both within and beyond UofT. Course topics include academic integrity, time management, learning strategies, and degree planning, as well as professional development, engineering in society, ethics, résumé-building, and volunteering.  

 

Critical Reading & Writing – IFP020Y1

Term: Fall & Winter
Faculty: Arts & Science | Architecture, Landscape & Design | Music

This course focuses on developing students’ academic reading skills through critical engagement with a variety of text genres including academic journal articles, research essays, and mainstream media.  This engagement leads to the development of students’ writing skills appropriate for exams and assignments expected during undergraduate courses within the Faculty of Arts and Science.  Writing may include responses to paragraph and comprehension questions as well as longer texts including annotated bibliographies, literature reviews, and argumentative essays.  The course primarily supports success in IFP100Y Themes in World History  through developing transferable skills in intensive reading, scaffolded assignment progression, and effective communication of original and cited ideas through writing.

Academic Literacies & Identities – IFP030Y1

Term: Fall & Winter
Faculty: Arts & Science | Architecture, Landscape & Design | Music

Being successful at university involves mastering a wide range of transferrable skills, learning to understand and adapt to university culture, as well as knowing how to utilize university resources and services appropriately. Through the core themes of academic literacies and identities, this course helps students develop a broad range of transferrable skills to become a more versatile and successful university student, in addition to becoming a more reflective and adaptive learner. Through a variety of practical exercises and assignments, in this course, students will learn to master foundational academic skills such as time management and goal setting, research and digital literacy, exam and study skills, as well as reflective and critical thinking.

IFP students take discipline-specific courses which correspond to their admission stream. These courses serve as an introduction to the academic requirements of first year courses in their admitted field of study. These courses, taught by instructors from specific departments, introduce the necessary vocabulary, assignment types, and evaluations used in their area of study.

Students select their discipline-specific course from a variety of choices:

Applied Concepts in Economics – IFP040H1

Term: Winter
Faculty: Arts & Science | Architecture, Landscape & Design

An introduction to basic concepts in Economics through the use of examples. The course covers a selection of  topics  from  both  Micro-and Macroeconomics,  including  marginal  cost/revenue/utility,  market efficiency, price elasticity of supply and demand, production, opportunity costs, inflation, gross domestic product, and concepts such as moral hazard, and cost-benefit analysis.

Reading and Writing in Mathematics – IFP050H1

Term: Winter
Faculty: Arts & Science | Architecture, Landscape & Design

This course focuses on improving students abilities to read and write mathematics. It is intended to hone your critical thinking skills and prepare you for proof-based courses in the coming years. We will study a variety of topics from pure mathematics in order to gain an understanding of what abstract mathematics is and how it is practiced. Topics include: popular methods of proof, basic concepts in number theory, geometry, logarithms, trigonometry and a brief introduction to calculus.

Problem Solving in the Sciences – IFP070H1

Term: Winter
Faculty: Arts & Science | Architecture, Landscape & Design

Students will be introduced to problem solving in the sciences in the areas of cell and molecular biology, chemistry, physics, and the life sciences. The goal of this course is to provide students with a strong background in scientific method and introduce them to key concepts in modern biology.

Information in the Digital Era – IFP080H1

Term: Winter
Faculty: Arts & Science | Architecture, Landscape & Design

In our current age of digital information, we consume news, entertainment, and even educational materials through online channels, quite often through rapid-fire shares on social media. This can make it difficult to not only find what we’re looking for, but also separate conflicting messages about what’s true. In this course, we will become detectives, explorers, and investigators into explore how information is produced, shared, and conveyed to the public; the impact digital media (e.g. Quercus, Facebook, Youtube, Twitter, Wikipedia, Instagram, etc.) has on individuals, organisations, and communities; and ways in which we can both critically assess and responsibly express ideas using digital tools. Students will use transferable skills that are important for disseminating information and successful communication in all academic disciplines. Welcome, explorers!  

Challenges to Global Equity – IFP090H1

Term: Winter
Faculty: Arts & Science | Architecture, Landscape & Design

The global political environment is increasingly caught between the emerging notions of human solidarity and aspirations to universal rights and equality on the one hand, and the realities of deep, abiding and enlarging gaps between rich and poor within and between countries on the other. This course discusses some of the key challenges, opportunities and limits to narrowing the gulf between aspirations for the attainment of global equity and current realities that signal its opposite. It does this through a political science lens and pays attention to both theoretical and empirical debates in comparative politics and international relations.

Engineering Foundations in Mathematics – IFP014Y1

Term: Fall & Winter
Faculty: Applied Science & Engineering

This course is intended to hone critical thinking skills. Students learn various definitions, properties, theorems, and other important mathematical results. Students also examine the ways of using logical thinking in applying knowledge to scientific problems. Course goals include: first, developing fluency and a deep understanding of various concepts and procedures and, second, training in the art of problem solving, which involves strategic and adaptive reasoning This course also aims to sharpen other transferable skills that are vital for up-and-coming engineers. These include the ability to creatively adapt prior knowledge to investigate new and unfamiliar problems, to generate appropriate and practical solutions to challenging questions, to collaborate with others and communicate ideas clearly, and to develop detailed plans and execute them effectively. 

Applied Music – IFP015Y1

Term: Fall & Winter
Faculty: Music

Faculty of Music students receive individual lessons from an instructor at the Faculty of Music while they attend the International Foundation Program.